Sep 7, 2000

Changing patterns of clinical malaria since 1965 among a tea estate population located in the Kenyan highlands

Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
G Dennis ShanksRobert W Snow

Abstract

The changing epidemiology of clinical malaria since 1965 among hospitalized patients was studied at a group of tea estates in the western highlands of Kenya. These data indicate recent dramatic increases in the numbers of malaria admissions (6.5 to 32.5% of all admissions), case fatality (1.3 to 6%) and patients originating from low-risk, highland areas (34 to 59%). Climate change, environmental management, population migration, and breakdown in health service provision seem unlikely explanations for this changing disease pattern. The coincident arrival of chloroquine resistance during the late 1980s in the subregion suggests that drug resistance is a key factor in the current pattern and burden of malaria among this highland population.

  • References5
  • Citations49

References

  • References5
  • Citations49

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Patterns
Health Services
Environment
Hospitalization
Malaria, Falciparum
Chloroquine
Malaria
Malaria Vaccines
Hospitalized Patients
Kenyans

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