Characterisation of clinically isolated Streptococcus pyogenes from balanoposthitis patients, with special emphasis on emm89 isolates

Journal of Medical Microbiology
Tadao HasegawaIchiro Tatsuno

Abstract

Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of diseases, such as pharyngitis and toxic shock syndrome. In addition, this bacterium is a causative agent of balanoposthitis. To reveal the bacteriological characteristics of the isolates from balanoposthitis patients, we analysed 47 isolates. In addition, novel clade genotype emm89 S. pyogenes isolates have been reported to be spreading worldwide recently. Hence, we further analysed eight emm89 isolates. A drug susceptibility experiment was performed and emm types were determined. More detailed experiments, such as PCR analysis for the presence of virulence-associated genes and MLST analysis, were performed especially using emm89 isolates. All isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, but 34 % of the isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The emm types of the isolates varied, with emm89 and emm11 being the most prevalent, but the emm1 type was not detected. The analysis of emm89 isolates revealed that drug susceptibilities varied. All isolates were negative for the hasABC gene and produced active NADase that are characteristics of novel clade genotype emm89 S. pyogenes. MLST analysis demonstrated that six isolates were of the ST101 type, the most predominant type reported thu...Continue Reading

Citations

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Related Concepts

Toxic Shock Syndrome
Bacterial Proteins
Genes
IgG Fc-binding protein, Streptococcus
Scarlatinal toxin
Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Etiology
Erythrogenic toxin
Pharmacologic Substance

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