Aug 17, 2002

Characterization of a self-transferable plasmid from Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium clinical isolates carrying two integron-borne gene cassettes together with virulence and drug resistance genes

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Beatriz GuerraM Carmen Mendoza

Abstract

An unusual self-transferable virulence-resistance plasmid (pUO-StVR2) was found in nine multidrug-resistant (ACSSuT phenotype) Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium clinical isolates that were assigned to four different phage types and a single and distinctive XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile. pUO-StVR2 is an IncFII plasmid of about 140 kb in length carrying the spvA, spvB, and spvC (Salmonella plasmid virulence) and rck (resistance to complement killing) genes. It also carries the oxa1/aadA1a (ampicillin resistance and streptomycin-spectinomycin resistance) gene cassette configuration located within a class 1 integron with qacEDelta1/sul1 (ammonium antiseptics resistance and sulfadiazine resistance); the transposon genes merA, tnpA, and tnpR (mercury resistance, transposase, and resolvase of Tn21, respectively); and the catA1 (chloramphenicol resistance) and tet(B) (tetracycline resistance) genes. The insertion of resistance genes into a Salmonella virulence plasmid constitutes a new and interesting example of plasmid evolution and presents a serious public health problem.

  • References26
  • Citations71

References

Mentioned in this Paper

Tetracycline Antibiotics
Antibiotic Resistance, Microbial
Mercury
Tetracyclines
Sulfadiazine
Transposase
ABCB5 gene
Genes
Spectinomycin
Tn21 resolvase

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