PMID: 10877847Jul 6, 2000Paper

Chemically prepared hevein domains: effect of C-terminal truncation and the mutagenesis of aromatic residues on the affinity for chitin

Protein Engineering
M MurakiKazuaki Harata

Abstract

Chemically prepared hevein domains (HDs), N-terminal domain of an antifungal protein from Nicotiana tabacum (CBP20-N) and an antimicrobial peptide from Amaranthus caudatus (Ac-AMP2), were examined for their affinity for chitin, a beta-1,4-linked polymer of N-acetylglucosamine. An intact binding domain, CBP20-N, showed a higher affinity than a C-terminal truncated domain, Ac-AMP2. The formation of a pyroglutamate residue from N-terminal Gln of CBP20-N increased the affinity. The single replacement of any aromatic residue of Ac-AMP2 with Ala resulted in a significant reduction in affinity, suggesting the importance of the complete set of three aromatic residues in the ligand binding site. The mutations of Phe18 of Ac-AMP2 to the residues with larger aromatic rings, i.e. Trp, beta-(1-naphthyl)alanine or beta-(2-naphthyl)alanine, enhanced the affinity, whereas the mutation of Tyr20 to Trp reduced the affinity. The affinity of an HD for chitin might be improved by adjusting the size and substituent group of stacking aromatic rings.

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Feb 21, 2002·Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta·Michiro MurakiKazuaki Harata
Nov 30, 2006·Biochemistry·Jody A Melton-WittRodney K Tweten
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