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Chronic helminth infections induce immunomodulation: consequences and mechanisms

Immunobiology

Jun 5, 2007

E van RietM Yazdanbakhsh

Abstract

Worldwide, more than a billion people are infected with helminths. These worm infections generally do not lead to mortality, however, they are chronic in nature and can lead to considerable morbidity. Immunologically these infections are interesting; chronic helminth infections are char...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

CD80 Antigens
Immune Response
Biochemical Pathway
Immune System
CD86 gene
Host-Parasite Interactions
lacto-N-fucopentaose III
T-Lymphocyte
Morbidity Aspects
Filarial worm
288
1
Paper Details
References
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  • Citations178
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Chronic helminth infections induce immunomodulation: consequences and mechanisms

Immunobiology

Jun 5, 2007

E van RietM Yazdanbakhsh

PMID: 17544832

DOI: 10.1016/j.imbio.2007.03.009

Abstract

Worldwide, more than a billion people are infected with helminths. These worm infections generally do not lead to mortality, however, they are chronic in nature and can lead to considerable morbidity. Immunologically these infections are interesting; chronic helminth infections are char...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

CD80 Antigens
Immune Response
Biochemical Pathway
Immune System
CD86 gene
Host-Parasite Interactions
lacto-N-fucopentaose III
T-Lymphocyte
Morbidity Aspects
Filarial worm
288
1

Similar Papers Found In These Feeds

Related Papers

Paper Details
References
  • References69
  • Citations178
12345...
  • References69
  • Citations178
12345...
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