PMID: 11829065Feb 7, 2002Paper

Clinical findings and treatment of listeriosis in 67 sheep and goats

The Veterinary Record
U BraunF Ehrensperger

Abstract

This paper describes the clinical findings and treatment of 67 sheep and goats with listeriosis. In 55 of them the diagnosis was made on the basis of the typical signs, which included vestibular ataxia, circling, head tilt and unilateral cranial nerve deficits, but in 12 animals a definitive diagnosis was made only after postmortem examination. The most significant haematological and biochemical findings were a high haematocrit in 16 animals, a high concentration of total protein in 33, a high concentration of bilirubin in 39 and a high concentration of urea nitrogen in 28 animals. Twenty-eight of the animals had a metabolic acidosis. Thirty-nine animals were treated with antibiotics, intravenous sodium chloride and glucose solutions and sodium bicarbonate. Ten of them survived and the others were euthanased because their condition deteriorated. Of the 10 that survived, nine were able to stand when they were first examined and one was in lateral recumbency. Of 15 animals treated with chloramphenicol, one survived; of 11 animals treated with oxytetracycline, two survived; and of nine animals treated with gentamicin and ampicillin, six survived.

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Citations

Mar 6, 2010·Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases·Anna OevermannMarc Vandevelde
Nov 9, 2010·The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice·Wendy M Townsend
Nov 4, 2005·The Veterinary Journal·U BraunF Ehrensperger
Jun 19, 2004·The Veterinary Clinics of North America. Food Animal Practice·Dawn E Morin
Mar 31, 2012·Virulence·Olivier Disson, Marc Lecuit
Jun 25, 2013·Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation : Official Publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc·Andrew L AllenBeth A Valentine
Nov 11, 2015·Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica·Tobias RevoldHenning Sørum
Oct 17, 2018·Nature Communications·Dennis PägelowMarcus Fulde
Apr 1, 2020·Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology·Timm KonoldMarion Simmons

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