PMID: 4846465Jul 27, 1974Paper

Clinical importance of infections due to Bacteroides fragilis and role of antibiotic therapy

British Medical Journal
D A Leigh

Abstract

Out of 200 infections due to Bacteroides fragilis occurring over a period of three years 133 were related to the intestinal tract, 55 to the genitourinary tract, and the remainder were in bedsores and ulcers; 56% occurred in patients undergoing major intestinal surgery.B. fragilis was isolated in pure culture from 56% of the infections. In mixed culture it was most commonly associated with Klebsiella and Enterobacter species. Other anaerobic bacteria were isolated in 9% of the mixed cultures.Altogether 131 (65.5%) of the patients recovered without antibiotic therapy or further surgery, but 59 (29.5%) developed complications and 10 (5%) died. The commonest complication was abscess formation, and the incidence was highest with infections associated with malignancy (44%) and lowest with obstetric infections (5%). The mortality was 5% overall but in the presence of bacteraemia it rose to 33%.Only 43 patients received appropriate chemotherapy. Clindamycin was the most effective antibiotic, having a recovery rate of 78%, but this rate was little better than in untreated patients (65%). The role of prophylactic antibiotic therapy in preventing bacteroides infection remains to be studied.The incidence of the isolation of bacteroides fr...Continue Reading

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Citations

Jul 1, 1977·Diseases of the Colon and Rectum·R DowningM R Keighley
Nov 1, 1978·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·P L GoldmanR G Petersdorf
Mar 26, 1977·British Medical Journal·A V Pollock, M Evans
Dec 1, 1974·Journal of Clinical Pathology·D A LeighE Norman
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Aug 1, 1981·The Journal of Applied Bacteriology·F Meisel-Mikołajczyk, I Grzelak-Puczyńska
May 1, 1975·The British Journal of Surgery·D A Leigh
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Dec 21, 2019·Journal of Molecular Biology·Ezequiel Valguarnera, Juliane Bubeck Wardenburg
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