Jun 5, 1998

"Cognitive dysmetria" as an integrative theory of schizophrenia: a dysfunction in cortical-subcortical-cerebellar circuitry?

Schizophrenia Bulletin
N C AndreasenD S O'Leary

Abstract

Earlier efforts to localize the symptoms of schizophrenia in a single brain region have been replaced by models that postulate a disruption in parallel distributed or dynamic circuits. Based on empirical data derived from both magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography, we have developed a model that implicates connectivity among nodes located in prefrontal regions, the thalamic nuclei, and the cerebellum. A disruption in this circuitry produces "cognitive dysmetria," difficulty in prioritizing, processing, coordinating, and responding to information. This "poor mental coordination" is a fundamental cognitive deficit in schizophrenia and can account for its broad diversity of symptoms.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Thalamic Nuclei
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Schizophrenia
Brain
Scintiphotography
Structure of Cortex of Kidney
Cognition Disorders
Subcortical

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