Aug 9, 2015

CoMEt: a statistical approach to identify combinations of mutually exclusive alterations in cancer

Genome Biology
Mark D M LeisersonBenjamin J Raphael

Abstract

Cancer is a heterogeneous disease with different combinations of genetic alterations driving its development in different individuals. We introduce CoMEt, an algorithm to identify combinations of alterations that exhibit a pattern of mutual exclusivity across individuals, often observed for alterations in the same pathway. CoMEt includes an exact statistical test for mutual exclusivity and techniques to perform simultaneous analysis of multiple sets of mutually exclusive and subtype-specific alterations. We demonstrate that CoMEt outperforms existing approaches on simulated and real data. We apply CoMEt to five different cancer types, identifying both known cancer genes and pathways, and novel putative cancer genes.

Mentioned in this Paper

TP53 gene
CD36 Antigens
IL7R
Glioblastoma Multiforme
CCNE1 gene
ErbB-2 Receptor
CDKN2C
EGFR
Biochemical Pathway
SSC4D

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