Dec 17, 2014

Common binding by redundant group B Sox proteins is evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Sarah H Carl, Steven Russell

Abstract

Background Group B Sox proteins are a highly conserved group of transcription factors that act extensively to coordinate nervous system development in higher metazoans while showing both co-expression and functional redundancy across a broad group of taxa. In Drosophila melanogaster , the two group B Sox proteins Dichaete and SoxNeuro show widespread common binding across the genome. While some instances of functional compensation have been observed in Drosophila , the function of common binding and the extent of its evolutionary conservation is not known. Results We used DamID-seq to examine the genome-wide binding patterns of Dichaete and SoxNeuro in four species of Drosophila . Through a quantitative comparison of Dichaete binding, we evaluated the rate of binding site turnover across the genome as well as at specific functional sites. We also examined the presence of Sox motifs within binding intervals and the correlation between sequence conservation and binding conservation. To determine whether common binding between Dichaete and SoxNeuro is conserved, we performed a detailed analysis of the binding patterns of both factors in two species. Conclusion We find that, while the regulatory networks driven by Dichaete and So...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Genome
Transcription, Genetic
SOX4 protein, human
Drosophila
Concept Conservation
Group B Streptococcal Pneumonia
Site
Ligand Binding Domain
Binding (Molecular Function)

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