PMID: 108220Jan 1, 1979

Comparative antibacterial activity of azlocillin, mezlocillin, carbenicillin and ticarcillin and relative stability to beta-lactamases of pseudomonas aeruginosa and klebsiella aerogenes

Infection
M J BaskerR Sutherland

Abstract

The antibacterial activities of two ureidopenicillins, azlocillin and mezlocillin, were compared with those of the alpha-carboxypenicillins, carbenicillin and ticarcillin, against a large number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. All four penicillins were active against a wide range of bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but there were differences in the antibacterial spectra and in the antibacterial effects demonstrated by the two classes of penicillins. In particular, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of azlocillin and mezlocillin against Klebsiella aerogenes and against P. aeruginosa were greatly influenced by the size of bacterial inoculum tested whereas there was no significant inoculum effect with carbenicillin and ticarcillin. In stability tests, the ureidopenicillins were inactivated rapidly by the beta-lactamases of K. aerogenes and P. aeruginosa whereas the alpha-carboxypenicillins were stable. It seems probable that the inoculum effect seen with azlocillin and mezlocillin in antibacterial tests with K. aerogenes and P. aeruginosa is associated with the instability of the compounds to the beta-lactamases of these bacteria.

References

May 1, 1977·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·D Stewart, G P Bodey
Mar 1, 1978·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·K P Fu, H C Neu
Jun 1, 1978·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·K P Fu, H C Neu
Apr 1, 1976·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·G P BodeyS S Weaver
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Jul 8, 1967·British Medical Journal·E T KnudsenR Sutherland

Citations

Jan 1, 1982·Infection·J A Hoogkamp-Korstanje, N A Westerdaal
Jan 1, 1993·Journal of Periodontal Research·P I EkeM Fritz
Jul 1, 1980·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·A R WhiteR Sutherland
Jul 1, 1985·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·D A ConradM I Marks
Mar 25, 1999·Mayo Clinic Proceedings·A J Wright
Feb 1, 1985·British Journal of Urology·W R Allan, A Kumar
Feb 8, 1985·The American Journal of Medicine·J D Allan, R C Moellering
Feb 18, 1988·The New England Journal of Medicine·G R Donowitz, G L Mandell
Nov 1, 1992·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology·M HedbergC E Nord
Apr 1, 1985·Infection Control : IC·S M Norris
Jan 1, 1981·The Journal of International Medical Research·J WelterV Freitag
Jun 7, 2019·The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy·Justin R Lenhard, Zackery P Bulman
Apr 1, 1985·Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery·P A Levine

Related Concepts

Beta-Lactamase
Geopen
Drug Interactions
Drug Stability
Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis
Fungus Drug Sensitivity Tests
Penicillin
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Ticillin

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