Apr 18, 2020

Evolution of predator foraging in response to prey infection favors species coexistence

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Loïc ProsnierN. Loeuille

Abstract

As acknowledged by Optimal Foraging theories, predator diets depend on prey profitability. Parasites, ubiquitous in food webs, are known to affect simultaneously host vulnerability to predation and host energy contents, thereby affecting profitabilities. In this work, we study the eco-evolutionary consequences of prey infection on predator diet. We also analyze the consequences for coexistence between prey, predators and parasites. We model a trophic module with one predator and two prey species, one of these prey being infected by a parasite, and distinguish between two effects of infection: a decrease in host fecundity (virulence effect) and an increase in vulnerability to predation (interaction effect). Predator foraging may evolve toward specialist or generalist strategies, the latter being less efficient on a given resource. We show that the virulence effect leads to specialisation on the non-infected prey while the interaction effect, by increasing prey profitability, favors specialisation on the infected prey. Combining the two effects at intermediate intensities promotes either generalist predators or the diversification of foraging strategies (coexistence of specialists), depending of trade-off shape. We then investiga...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Calcinus elegans
Fertility
Embryo
Cyartonema elegans
Coleonyx elegans
Size
Research
Oculodigitoesophagoduodenal Syndrome
Cestrum elegans
Clarkia unguiculata

Related Feeds

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.