Apr 29, 2011

Concomitant hypermethylation of multiple genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

Folia Histochemica Et Cytobiologica
Meiju JiPeng Hou

Abstract

Primary lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Promoter hypermethylation is a major inactivation mechanism of tumor-related genes, and increasingly appears to play an important role in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we used quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) assays to analyze promoter hypermethylation of nine genes in a large cohort of well-characterized non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and explore their associations with the clinicopathological features of tumor. We found that there were significant differences in methylation levels for six of nine gene promoters between cancerous and noncancerous lung tissues. More importantly, with 100% diagnostic specificity, high sensitivity, ranging from 44.9% to 84.1%, was found for each of the nine genes. Interestingly, promoter hypermethylation of most genes was closely associated with histologic type, which was more frequent in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) than in adenocarcinomas (ADC). In addition, highly frequent concomitant methylation of multiple genes was found in NSCLC, particularly in SCC. Our data showed that multiple genes were aberrantly methylated in lung tumorigenesis, and that they were closely associated with certain clinic...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Protein Methylation
Lung
Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Pathway
Neoplasms
Methylate
DNA Methylation
Promoter
Tumor Markers
Operator gene
Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

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