D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-regulated gene expression of striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons

Science
C R GerfenD R Sibley

Abstract

The striatum, which is the major component of the basal ganglia in the brain, is regulated in part by dopaminergic input from the substantia nigra. Severe movement disorders result from the loss of striatal dopamine in patients with Parkinson's disease. Rats with lesions of the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway caused by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) serve as a model for Parkinson's disease and show alterations in gene expression in the two major output systems of the striatum to the globus pallidus and substantia nigra. Striatopallidal neurons show a 6-OHDA-induced elevation in their specific expression of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) encoding the D2 dopamine receptor and enkephalin, which is reversed by subsequent continuous treatment with the D2 agonist quinpirole. Conversely, striatonigral neurons show a 6-OHDA-induced reduction in their specific expression of mRNAs encoding the D1 dopamine receptor and substance P, which is reversed by subsequent daily injections of the D1 agonist SKF-38393. This treatment also increases dynorphin mRNA in striatonigral neurons. Thus, the differential effects of dopamine on striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons are mediated by their specific expression of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor subtypes, respe...Continue Reading

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Related Concepts

Quinpirole Hydrochloride
Biochemical Pathway
Oxidopamine Hydrobromide
Globus Pallidus
Neostriatum
Paleostriatum
Neurons
Brain
Lentiform Nucleus Structure
Entire Basal Nuclei

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