Death is the major fate of medial edge epithelial cells and the cause of basal lamina degradation during palatogenesis

Development
Rodrigo Cuervo, Luis Covarrubias

Abstract

During mammalian development, a pair of shelves fuses to form the secondary palate, a process that requires the adhesion of the medial edge epithelial tissue (MEE) of each shelf and the degeneration of the resulting medial epithelial seam (MES). It has been reported that epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) occurs during shelf fusion and is considered a fundamental process for MES degeneration. We recently found that cell death is a necessary process for shelf fusion. These findings uncovered the relevance of cell death in MES degeneration; however, they do not discard the participation of other processes. In the present work, we focus on the evaluation of the processes that could contribute to palate shelf fusion. We tested EMT by traditional labeling of MEE cells with a dye, by infection of MEE with an adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene, and by fusing wild-type shelves with the ones from EGFP-expressing mouse embryos. Fate of MEE labeled cells was followed by culturing whole palates, or by a novel slice culture system that allows individual cells to be followed during the fusion process. Very few labeled cells were found in the mesenchyme compartment, and almost all were undergoing cell death. Inhibition of metalloprote...Continue Reading

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Related Concepts

Embryo
Abnormal Degeneration
Structure of Papilla Incisiva of Mouth
Organ Culture Techniques
Squamous Transitional Epithelial Cell Count
Epithelium
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Meckel-Gruber Syndrome
Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition
Basal Lamina

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