Apr 16, 2020

Genetic variation reveals individual-level climate tracking across the full annual cycle of a migratory bird

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Rachael A BayK. Ruegg

Abstract

Adaptation across climate gradients can provide the raw material needed for evolutionary response to climate change. In migratory species, studies of local climate adaptation are made challenging by seasonal movement, where it is unclear to what extent individuals track their local climate niches across the annual cycle. In the migratory songbird yellow warbler (Setophaga petechia), we test the hypothesis that individuals track similar climates between their breeding and wintering ranges. Further, we examine whether adaptation to local climate might lead to morphological differences among populations and different demographic responses to temporal climate variability. We find a correlation between wintering and breeding precipitation but not temperature regimes at the level of the individual bird. Specifically, birds from the driest wintering regions migrate to the driest breeding regions. Additionally, we find an association between bill size and breeding season precipitation which, given documented climate-associated genomic variation, suggests adaptation to local precipitation gradients might exist on the breeding grounds. Finally, we show geographic variation in the effect of precipitation on demography, with higher precipi...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Mastigophora
Spatial Distribution
Environment
Laboratory
Disease Susceptibility
Protista
Euglena gracilis
Local
Species
Population Group

Related Feeds

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.