Detection of Hb H disease genotypes common in northern Thailand by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and high resolution melting analyses

Hemoglobin
Teerapat SeeratanachotDawan Shimbhu

Abstract

We used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and high resolution melting (HRM) analyses for the detection of the common α-thalassemia (α-thal) genotypes in 40 northern Thai Hb H (β4) patients. The α(0)-thal [- -(SEA) (Southeast Asian) deletion] was detected by a multiplex gap real-time PCR. To determine the α(+)-thal, three primer pairs were designed. The A-primer pair was used to amplify the 3' terminal DNA sequences of the HBA2 gene, and the B-primer pair amplified the 5' flanking region of the HBA1 gene. The C-primer pair amplified the 3' terminal DNA sequences of the HBA1 gene and was used as an internal control. The -α(4.2) (leftward) and -α(3.7) (rightward) deletions were determined by monitoring the absence of PCR product(s). The Hb H patients who had a negative PCR result for the A-primer pair but positive for the B- and C-primer pairs carried the -α(4.2) deletion, while the -α(3.7) deletion carriers were negative for the A- and B-primer pairs. In the case of Hb H with Hb Constant Spring (Hb CS, α142, Term→Gln; HBA2: c.427T>C), all primer pairs were positive, HRM analysis of the PCR product of the A-primer pair was introduced to analyze the Hb CS gene. It can distinguish clearly between normal and Hb ...Continue Reading

References

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Related Concepts

Sense Codon
DNA Mutational Analysis
Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration Determination
Mini-Exon
Hemoglobin H
Alpha-Thalassemia
Beta-Globins
Kinetic Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA
Gene Deletion

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