Nov 26, 2015

Differential dynamics of the mammalian mRNA and protein expression response to misfolding stress

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Zhe ChengChristine Vogel

Abstract

The relative importance of regulation at the mRNA versus protein level is subject to ongoing debate. To address this question in a dynamic system, we mapped the proteomics and transcriptomics changes in mammalian cells responding to stress induced by dithiothreitol over 30 hours. Specifically, we estimated the kinetic parameters for synthesis and degradation of RNA and proteins, and deconvoluted response patterns common and unique to each regulatory level using a new statistical tool. Overall, both regulatory levels were equally important, but differed in their impact on molecule concentrations. Both mRNA and protein changes peaked between two and eight hours, but mRNA expression fold changes were much smaller than those of the proteins. Further, mRNA concentrations were regulated in a transient, spike-like pattern and returned to values close to pre-treatment levels by the end of the experiment. In contrast, protein concentrations switched only once and established a new steady state, consistent with the dominant role of protein regulation during misfolding stress. Finally, we generated hypotheses on specific regulatory modes for example groups of genes.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Patterns
Genes
Regulation of Biological Process
JM 2820
Dithiothreitol
Proteomics
RNA, Messenger
MRNA Expression
Catabolism
Regulation of Protein Metabolic Process

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