Differential expression of immune defences is associated with specific host-parasite interactions in insects

PloS One
C E RiddellE B Mallon

Abstract

Recent ecological studies in invertebrates show that the outcome of an infection is dependent on the specific pairing of host and parasite. Such specificity contrasts the long-held view that invertebrate innate immunity depends on a broad-spectrum recognition system. An important question is whether this specificity is due to the immune response rather than some other interplay between host and parasite genotypes. By measuring the expression of putative bumblebee homologues of antimicrobial peptides in response to infection by their gut trypanosome Crithidia bombi, we demonstrate that expression differences are associated with the specific interactions.

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Datasets Mentioned

BETA
AY423049

Methods Mentioned

BETA
PCR

Related Concepts

Metazoa
Host-Parasite Interactions
Immune System
Resistance, Natural
Insecta
RNA
Variation (Genetics)
Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction
cDNA Probes
MRNA Differential Display

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