PMID: 15544082Nov 17, 2004

Disappearance of differences in antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in hospitals and in general practice

Medycyna doświadczalna i mikrobiologia
E Krzywińska, J Galiński

Abstract

There is general opinion that Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in hospitals are more frequently resistant to antibiotics than community strains, however, the increasing resemblance between hospital and community strains has been recently reported. The aim of the study was to compare the antibiotic resistance and phage-type pattern of S. aureus strains isolated from patients treated either in hospitals or in general practice in northern part of Poland. The study was conducted on 771 S. aureus strains isolated from different specimens. Phage typing was performed according to the method of Blair and Williams. The drug susceptibility was determined by the disc-diffusion method. There were no significant differences in antibiotic resistance or phage-type pattern when hospital and community methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains were compared. The most MSSA were resistant to penicillin (84.6% and 82.1% respectively) and doxycycline (49.3% and 50.4% respectively) whereas they were rarely resistant to other antibiotics. The predominance of phage group II was found in both hospitals (28.0%) and general practice (29.9%). Phage group III, usually associated with hospitals, occurred in small percentage (12.9% and 9.4% respect...Continue Reading

Related Concepts

Bacteriophage Typing
Family Medicine (Field)
Hospitals, Community
Fungus Drug Sensitivity Tests
Staphylococcus aureus
Methicillin-Resistant
Antibiotic Resistance, Bacterial
Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial

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