Dec 2, 2019

Disrupting female flight in the vector Aedes aegypti

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Sarah O'Leary, Zach Adelman

Abstract

Aedes aegypti is a vector of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Current vector control strategies such as community engagement, source reduction, and insecticides have not been sufficient to prevent viral outbreaks. Thus, interest in novel strategies involving genetic engineering is growing. Female mosquitoes rely on flight to mate with males and obtain a bloodmeal from a host. We hypothesized that knockout of genes specifically expressed in female mosquitoes associated with the indirect flight muscles would result in a flightless female mosquito. With the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we performed embryonic microinjections of Cas9 protein and guide RNAs specific to genes hypothesized to control flight in mosquitoes, and have obtained genetic knockouts in several genes specifically expressed in the flight-muscle, including those specific to female flight muscle. Analysis of the phenotype of these female-specific gene knockout mutants resulted in flightless females and flying males. While further assessment is required, this work lays the groundwork for a mechanism of population control that is female-specific for the Ae. aegypti vector.

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Dengue Fever
Embryo
Microinjections
Genes
Knock-out
Evaluation
Genetic Vectors
Aedes aegypti
Mice, Knockout
Muscle

About this Paper

Related Feeds

CRISPR Ribonucleases Deactivation

CRISPR-Cas system enables the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. This feed focuses on mechanisms that underlie deactivation of CRISPR ribonucleases. Here is the latest research.

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.

CRISPR in Malaria

CRISPR-Cas system enables the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. This technology is being investigated to combat malaria by targeting specific stretches of vector DNA and editing the genome at precise locations. Here is the latest research.

CRISPR (general)

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are DNA sequences in the genome that are recognized and cleaved by CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). CRISPR-Cas system enables the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. Discover the latest research on CRISPR here.

CRISPR for Genome Editing (Preprints)

Genome editing technologies enable the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are DNA sequences in the genome that are recognized and cleaved by CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). Here are the latest preprints on the use of CRISPR-Cas system in gene editing.

CRISPR for Genome Editing

Genome editing technologies enable the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are DNA sequences in the genome that are recognized and cleaved by CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). Here is the latest research on the use of CRISPR-Cas system in gene editing.

CRISPR Genome Editing & Therapy (Preprints)

CRISPR-Cas system enables the editing of genes to create or correct mutations. This feed focuses on the application of this system for gene editing and therapy in human diseases.