Mar 29, 2015

Disturbance of poised chromatin coincides with increased expression of developmental genes in cancer

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Stephan H BernhartSteve Hoffmann

Abstract

Poised (bivalent or paused) chromatin comprises activating and repressing histone modifications at the same location ([Voigt et al., 2013][1]). This combination of epigenetic marks keeps genes expressed at low levels but poised for rapid activation ([Margaritis and Holstege, 2008][2]; [Mikkelsen et al., 2007][3]). Typically, DNA at poised promoters carries low levels of methylation in normal cells ([Meissner et al., 2008][4]; [Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium et al., 2015][5]), but frequently shows elevated methylation levels in cancer samples ([Hinoue et al., 2012][6]; [Gal-Yam et al., 2008][7]; [Ohm et al., 2007][8]; [Rodriguez et al., 2008][9]; [Easwaran et al., 2012][10]). Although higher levels of methylation are normally associated with transcriptional silencing, recently counter-intuitive positive correlations between methylation and expression levels have been reported for two cancer types ([Hahn et al., 2014][11]; Kretzmer et al.,). Here, we analyze one of the largest combined expression and methylation data-sets to date, comprising over 5,000 samples and demonstrate that the hypermethylation of poised chromatin in conjunction with up-regulation of the corresponding genes is a general phenomenon in cancer. This up-regula...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Normal Cell
Protein Methylation
Genes
Transcription, Genetic
Promoter
Study of Epigenetics
Chromatin Silencing
Methylation
Histone Modification
Genes, Developmental

Related Feeds

Cancer Epigenetics & Metabolism (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. This feed focuses on the relationship between cell metabolism, epigenetics and tumor differentiation.

Cancer Epigenetics and Chromatin (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. This feed focuses on chromatin and its role in cancer epigenetics please follow this feed to learn more.

Cancer Epigenetics Chromatin Complexes (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. This feed focuses on chromatin complexes and their role in cancer epigenetics.

Cancer Epigenetics (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics.

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.

Cancer Epigenetics & Methyl-CpG (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics and methyl-CpG binding proteins including ZBTB38.

Cancer Epigenetics

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics.

Cell Signaling & Cancer Epigenetics (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. This feed covers the latest research on signaling and epigenetics in cell growth and cancer.