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Divergent roles for C-type lectins expressed by cells of the innate immune system

Molecular Immunology

Oct 13, 2004

Eamon P McGrealSiamon Gordon

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PubMed

Abstract

In recent years there has been increasing interest in the diversity and function of carbohydrates present on a range of endogenous mammalian glycoproteins and pathogen surfaces. It is clear that carbohydrate structures are not merely structural components of the molecules which bear the...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Microorganism
Embryo
Establishment and Maintenance of Localization
Immune Response
Immune System
Carbohydrate nutrients
CD206 antigen
T-Lymphocyte
Endo180
Transfection
Paper Details
References
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  • Citations95
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  • References89
  • Citations95
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Divergent roles for C-type lectins expressed by cells of the innate immune system

Molecular Immunology

Oct 13, 2004

Eamon P McGrealSiamon Gordon

PMID: 15476922

DOI: 10.1016/j.molimm.2004.06.013

Abstract

In recent years there has been increasing interest in the diversity and function of carbohydrates present on a range of endogenous mammalian glycoproteins and pathogen surfaces. It is clear that carbohydrate structures are not merely structural components of the molecules which bear the...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Microorganism
Embryo
Establishment and Maintenance of Localization
Immune Response
Immune System
Carbohydrate nutrients
CD206 antigen
T-Lymphocyte
Endo180
Transfection

Feeds With Similar Papers

Endocytic System

Adsorptive and receptor-mediated endocytosis via clathrin-coated vesicles provides the major and best-characterized portal for uptake of multiple molecules and particles into cells. Via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, cells receive nutrients, regulate receptors and other plasma membrane constituents, take up antigens, and remove senescent, excess, and potentially harmful substances from the extracellular fluid. Discover the latest research on endocytic system here.

Chromosomal Deletion

Chromosomal deletion includes the loss of a gene sequence of DNA. The location and the genes deleted determines the significance of this abnormality. There are many identified genetic disorders that are a result from chromosomal deletion including cri du chat and Prader-Willi syndrome. Discover the latest research on chromosomal deletions here.

Related Papers

Science

Decoding the patterns of self and nonself by the innate immune system

ScienceApril 16, 2002
Ruslan Medzhitov, Charles A Janeway
Annual Review of Immunology

Self- and nonself-recognition by C-type lectins on dendritic cells

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Paper Details
References
  • References89
  • Citations95
12345...
  • References89
  • Citations95
12345...

Download from

Publisher
PubMed
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