Dec 1, 2009

DNA hypermethylation of tumors from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is associated with gender and histologic type

Lung Cancer : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
Stephen E HawesHubert Vesselle

Abstract

We previously identified a number of genes which were methylated significantly more frequently in the tumor compared to the non-cancerous lung tissues from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Detection of methylation profiles of genes in NSCLC could provide insight into differential pathways to malignancy and lead to strategies for better treatment of individuals with NSCLC. We determined the DNA methylation status of 27 genes using quantitative MethyLight assays in lung tumor samples from 117 clinically well-characterized NSCLC patients. Hypermethylation was detected in one of more of the genes in 106 (91%) of 117 cases and was detected at high levels (percentage methylation reference (PMR)> or =4%) in 79% of NSCLC cases. Methylation of APC, CCND2, KCNH5 and, RUNX was significantly more frequent in adenocarcinomas compared to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), while methylation of CDKN2A was more common in SCC. Hypermethylation of KCNH5, KCNH8, and RARB was more frequent in females compared to males. Hypermethylation of APC and CCND2 was inversely associated with proliferation score assessed by Ki-67 level. Our findings of differential gene hypermethylation frequencies in tumor tissues from patients with adenocarcinoma o...Continue Reading

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  • Citations23
  • References42
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Mentioned in this Paper

Pathogenic Aspects
MN20 protein, human
Biochemical Pathway
Hydrogen sulfite
DNA Methylation [PE]
Squamous Cell Neoplasms
Pathogenesis
Histology Procedure
Protein Methylation
GSTP1 gene

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