Do the imidazoles have a role in the management of genitourinary fungal infections?

The Journal of Urology
G J WiseP J Kozinn

Abstract

The imidazoles have demonstrated antifungal activity against a number of fungi that are pathogenic for man. Effective clinical use has been demonstrated in patients with cutaneous and systemic candidiasis, aspergillosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcus and systemic candidiasis, aspergillosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, cryptococcus and histoplasmosis. We report our experience with the oral imidazole agent ketoconazole in the management of 8 patients with significant urinary candidiasis as judged by elevated urinary candidal counts (greater than 15,000/ml.). Only 4 of the 8 patients had resolution of candiduria with ketoconazole therapy. Intravenous miconazole, another imidazole, has been available for treatment of systemic and genitourinary fungal infections. Limited success (50 per cent) with intravenous miconazole has been noted in the treatment of systemic candidiasis with urinary involvement. Miconazole also has been used as a systemic and local irrigant in the treatment of bladder and renal candidiasis. Based on these observations and our own studies, we believe that the imidazoles have a limited role in the management of patients with significant fungal involvement of the urinary tract.

References

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Citations

Aug 1, 1990·The Journal of Urology·G J Wise
May 1, 1989·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology·J R Graybill
Dec 1, 1987·The Journal of Urology·G J WiseR G Rothenberg

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