Feb 17, 2009

Drosophila intestinal response to bacterial infection: activation of host defense and stem cell proliferation

Cell Host & Microbe
Nicolas BuchonBruno Lemaitre

Abstract

Although Drosophila systemic immunity is extensively studied, little is known about the fly's intestine-specific responses to bacterial infection. Global gene expression analysis of Drosophila intestinal tissue to oral infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia carotovora revealed that immune responses in the gut are regulated by the Imd and JAK-STAT pathways, but not the Toll pathway. Ingestion of bacteria had a dramatic impact on the physiology of the gut that included modulation of stress response and increased stem cell proliferation and epithelial renewal. Our data suggest that gut homeostasis is maintained through a balance between cell damage due to the collateral effects of bacteria killing and epithelial repair by stem cell division. The Drosophila gut provides a powerful model to study the integration of stress and immunity with pathways associated with stem cell control, and this study should prove to be a useful resource for such further studies.

  • References31
  • Citations322
  • References31
  • Citations322

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Gram-Positive Bacteria
Malpighian Tubules
Microorganism
Metabolic Process, Cellular
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Immune Response
Protease Inhibitors [MoA]
Immunofluorescence Assay
Biochemical Pathway
Microarray Analysis

Related Feeds

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.

Cancer Metabolism

In order for cancer cells to maintain rapid, uncontrolled cell proliferation, they must acquire a source of energy. Cancer cells acquire metabolic energy from their surrounding environment and utilize the host cell nutrients to do so. Here is the latest research on cancer metabolism.

Candida albicans

Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. Discover the latest research on Candida albicans here.

Adult Stem Cells

Adult stem cells reside in unique niches that provide vital cues for their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation. They hold great promise for use in tissue repair and regeneration as a novel therapeutic strategies. Here is the latest research.

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure (ASM)

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Candidiasis

Candidiasis is a common fungal infection caused by Candida and it can affect many parts for the body including mucosal membranes as well as the gastrointestinal, urinary, and respiratory tracts. Here is the latest research.

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Candidiasis (ASM)

Candidiasis is a common fungal infection caused by Candida and it can affect many parts for the body including mucosal membranes as well as the gastrointestinal, urinary, and respiratory tracts. Here is the latest research.