Dynamical System Modeling to Simulate Donor T Cell Response to Whole Exome Sequencing-Derived Recipient Peptides Demonstrates Different Alloreactivity Potential In HLA-Matched and Mismatched Donor-Recipient Pairs

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Badar Abdul RazzaqAmir A Toor

Abstract

Immune reconstitution kinetics and subsequent clinical outcomes in HLA matched recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) are variable and difficult to predict. Considering SCT as a dynamical system, may allow sequence differences across the exomes of the transplant donors and recipients to be used to simulate an alloreactive T cell response, which may allow better clinical outcome prediction. To accomplish this, whole exome sequencing was performed on 34 HLA matched SCT donor-recipient pairs (DRP), and the nucleotide sequence differences translated to peptides. The binding affinity of the peptides to the relevant HLA in each DRP was determined. The resulting array of peptide-HLA binding affinity values in each patient was considered as an operator modifying a hypothetical T cell repertoire vector, in which each T cell clone proliferates in accordance to the logistic equation of growth. Using an iterating system of matrices, each simulated T cell clone’s growth was calculated with the steady state population being proportional to the magnitude of the binding affinity of the driving HLA-peptide complex. Incorporating competition between T cell clones responding to different HLA-peptide complexes reproduces a number...Continue Reading

Related Concepts

Antigens
Base Sequence
Clone Cells
HLA Antigens
Peptides
Stem Cells
T-Lymphocyte
Transplantation
Matching
Titration Method

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