E6-induced selective translation of WNT4 and JIP2 promotes the progression of cervical cancer via a noncanonical WNT signaling pathway

Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy
Lin ZhaoYi Shi

Abstract

mRNA translation reprogramming occurs frequently in many pathologies, including cancer and viral infection. It remains largely unknown whether viral-induced alterations in mRNA translation contribute to carcinogenesis. Most cervical cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus infection, resulting in the malignant transformation of normal epithelial cells mainly via viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Here, we utilized polysome profiling and deep RNA sequencing to systematically evaluate E6-regulated mRNA translation in HPV18-infected cervical cancer cells. We found that silencing E6 can cause over a two-fold change in the translation efficiency of ~653 mRNAs, most likely in an eIF4E- and eIF2α-independent manner. In addition, we identified that E6 can selectively upregulate the translation of WNT4, JIP1, and JIP2, resulting in the activation of the noncanonical WNT/PCP/JNK pathway to promote cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Ectopic expression of WNT4/JIP2 can effectively rescue the decreased cell proliferation caused by E6 silencing, strongly suggesting that the WNT4/JIP2 pathway mediates the role of E6 in promoting cell proliferation. Thus, our results revealed a novel oncogenic mechanism of E6 via regula...Continue Reading

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Citations

Jul 3, 2020·Cancer Cell International·Milad AshrafizadehSaeed Samarghandian
May 9, 2021·Endocrinology·Lauren M PitzerMatthew J Sikora
Oct 14, 2021·Cell Death Discovery·Quanlong ZhangLuping Qin

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Methods Mentioned

BETA
RNA-Seq
xenograft
xenografts
reverse-transcription PCR
PCR

Software Mentioned

GSEA

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