PMID: 7195156Apr 1, 1981Paper

Effect in man of anti-allergic drugs on the immediate and late phase cutaneous allergic reactions induced by anti-IgE

Allergy
R GrönnebergO Zetterström

Abstract

Wheal and flare reactions as well as a late cutaneous allergic reaction (LCAR) were induced by anti-human IgE in healthy subjects. The effect of the beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulant terbutaline, the histamine-1 (H1) receptor blocking agent mepyramine and the synthetic glucocorticoid betamethasone on these reactions was studied. All administrations were given intradermally (i.d.). The immediate reaction to anti-IgE was inhibited by 3 micrograms terbutaline and 30 micrograms mepyramine (P less than 0.01) whereas 50 micrograms betamethasone had no effects. Terbutaline had no effect on the flare response induced by i.d. injected histamine but a slight effect on whealing. Terbutaline and mepyramine weakly reduced the LCAR throughout the observation period of 24 h (P less than 0.01). In contrast, betamethasone almost completely abolished the LCAR. It is concluded that the two phases of the skin reaction to anti-IgE are interrelated since an inhibition of the early phase was followed by an attenuation of the LCAR. The mechanism of action of steroids seems to differ fundamentally from that of other anti-allergic drugs since inhibition of the early step in the reaction is not essential to the action on the late step. It is further suggeste...Continue Reading

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Citations

May 1, 1990·Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology·E Henocq, J P Rihoux
Jan 1, 1992·Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology·V VarneyA B Kay
Feb 1, 1992·Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology·M JohnsonC J Whelan
Feb 1, 1992·Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology·R Grönneberg, O Zetterström
May 1, 1993·Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology·W A MasseyL M Lichtenstein
Aug 1, 1992·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·R F HerrscherT J Sullivan
Nov 7, 2012·Indian Dermatology Online Journal·Chembolli Lakshmi, Cr Srinivas
Jun 25, 2014·American Journal of Veterinary Research·Michelle C WoodwardCherie M Pucheu-Haston
Aug 21, 2009·The Journal of Urology·Jennie J MickelsonEarl Y Cheng
Apr 30, 2009·Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology·A TomkinsonJ Tepper
May 1, 1990·The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology·R Grönneberg, S E Dahlén
Sep 1, 1983·International Journal of Dermatology·R F Lemanske, M A Kaliner
Aug 24, 1999·The Journal of Urology·M A MonsourG E Dean
Mar 1, 1985·Clinical Allergy·R Grönneberg, O Zetterström
Jan 1, 1985·Allergy·R Grönneberg, O Zetterström
Sep 9, 2005·The Journal of Urology·Jeffrey S PalmerLane S Palmer
Jan 1, 1984·The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma·V T Popa

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