Effect of a pressor infusion of angiotensin II on sympathetic activity and heart rate in normal humans

Circulation Research
S R Goldsmith, G J Hasking

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that pressor infusions of angiotensin II (AII) could stimulate the sympathetic nervous system as reflected by norepinephrine (NE) spillover in humans. AII was infused at 5 ng/kg/min in six healthy volunteers, with vehicle and phenylephrine infusions as controls, on 3 separate days. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, plasma NE, NE clearance, and NE spillover were assessed before and after 30-minute infusions of AII, vehicle, or phenylephrine in the supine position and then after 15 minutes of head-up and 15 minutes of head-down tilt. Both AII and phenylephrine raised mean arterial pressure (88 +/- 9.6 to 103 +/- 14 mm Hg, p less than 0.001, and 91 +/- 7.6 to 104 +/- 9.2 mm Hg, p less than 0.001, respectively), whereas heart rate fell only with phenylephrine (60 +/- 6 to 51 +/- 6.3 beats/min, p less than 0.001). Neither plasma NE nor NE spillover was affected by either infusion, and NE clearance declined slightly with both. No changes occurred in any variable during vehicle infusions in the supine position. During upright tilt, NE spillover increases were attenuated by both AII and phenylephrine while NE clearance changes were slightly greater, leaving plasma NE increases similar on each day. During head...Continue Reading

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Citations

Jul 23, 2005·Current Heart Failure Reports·Steven R Goldsmith
Oct 1, 1992·Journal of the American College of Cardiology·S R GoldsmithE Miller
Apr 1, 1993·Journal of the American College of Cardiology·S R GoldsmithE Miller
Jan 1, 1995·Journal of the American College of Cardiology·S R Goldsmith, G J Hasking
Oct 8, 2014·Critical Care : the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum·Lakhmir S ChawlaMichael G Seneff
Jul 15, 1999·Journal of Cardiac Failure·S R Goldsmith
May 3, 2000·Medical Hypotheses·D F DavilaC Mazzei de Davila
Jul 7, 2017·American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology·Eduardo R AzevedoJohn D Parker
Jun 14, 2013·EuroIntervention : Journal of EuroPCR in Collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology·Rosa L de Jager, Peter J Blankestijn
Jun 14, 2013·EuroIntervention : Journal of EuroPCR in Collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology·Dagmara HeringMarkus P Schlaich
Jul 17, 2001·American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology·D M FarrellL J Dell'Italia
Sep 25, 2015·American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology·Friedhelm SaykChristoph Dodt
Sep 1, 1993·The American Journal of Physiology·R R Townsend, D J DiPette
Mar 5, 2020·American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology·Friedhelm SaykMoritz Meusel

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