PMID: 3603622Jan 1, 1986Paper

Effect of albendazole sulphoxide on viability of hydatid protoscoleces in vitro

Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
J B Chinnery, D L Morris

Abstract

Hydatid protoscoleces obtained from sheep (infected with Echinococcus granulosus) were treated in culture medium with albendazole sulphoxide at final concentrations of 100, 500 and 1000 micrograms/l and the viability was assessed at regular intervals. Over a period of up to 31 days concentrations of 500 and 1000 micrograms/l of sulphoxide significantly reduced the viability in treated groups, as compared with appropriate controls, whilst 100 micrograms/l of sulphoxide had no effect.

References

Jan 1, 1986·European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology·S E MarrinerJ A Bogan
Apr 12, 1985·JAMA : the Journal of the American Medical Association·D L MorrisM J Clarkson
Jan 1, 1985·European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology·P Van GelderW H Tsui
Jan 8, 1983·British Medical Journal·D L MorrisF G Burrows
Jan 1, 1980·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·J D Smyth, N J Barrett

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Citations

Dec 24, 2005·Parasitology Research·M ElissondoG Denegri
Dec 16, 2006·Parasitology Research·M ElissondoG Denegri
Apr 1, 1994·International Journal for Parasitology·J Pérez-SerranoF Rodriguez-Caabeiro
Jan 1, 1987·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·D L MorrisK S Richards
Jan 1, 1988·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·D H TaylorK S Richards
Jan 1, 1988·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·D H Taylor, D L Morris
Jan 1, 1988·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·D H TaylorD Reffin
Mar 3, 2004·La Revue de médecine interne·J I BaY Mouton
Jan 9, 1998·International Journal for Parasitology·M B PetersenH Bjørn
Apr 5, 2000·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·R BonifacinoD Da Rosa
Oct 16, 2002·Trends in Parasitology·Andrew HemphillBruno Gottstein
Jun 1, 1990·Journal of Helminthology·D L Morris, D H Taylor
Apr 8, 1999·Clinical and Experimental Immunology·R RiganòA Siracusano
Jun 1, 1993·British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology·H WenP S Craig
May 25, 2004·Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy·Francisca PalomaresHelgi Jung Cook
Sep 14, 2011·Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology : Official Journal of the Saudi Gastroenterology Association·UNKNOWN Shams-Ul-BariZahoor A Naikoo
Jun 13, 2015·Journal of Parasitic Diseases : Official Organ of the Indian Society for Parasitology·Mahdi FakharFatemeh Rezaei
Feb 1, 2008·Parasitology International·M Celina ElissondoGuillermo Denegri
Jul 3, 2002·Clinics in Chest Medicine·Bruno Gottstein, Jürg Reichen
Mar 27, 2013·Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B, Applied Biomaterials·Yang LiuXue-nong Zhang
Sep 1, 1987·The British Journal of Surgery·D L Morris
Jan 1, 1987·Gut·D L MorrisB Golematis
Jul 30, 2004·The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy·Mirjam WalkerAndrew Hemphill
Feb 10, 2017·PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases·Julia A LoosAndrea C Cumino
Jan 1, 1992·Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases·M EllisJ Sieck
Feb 1, 1991·Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology·J T Allen, C Arme

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