PMID: 2759949Jul 1, 1989Paper

Effect of sleep on nocturnal bronchoconstriction and ventilatory patterns in asthmatics

Journal of Applied Physiology
R D BallardR J Martin

Abstract

To assess the effect of sleep on airflow resistance and patterns of ventilation in asthmatic patients with nocturnal worsening, 10 adult subjects (6 asthmatic patients with nocturnal worsening, 4 normal controls) were monitored overnight in the sleep laboratory on two separate occasions. During 1 night, subjects were allowed to sleep normally, whereas during the other night all sleep was prevented. The six asthmatic patients demonstrated progressive increases in lower airway resistance (Rla) on both nights, but the rate of increase was twofold greater (P less than 0.0001) during the sleep night compared with the sleep prevention night. However, overnight decrements in forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1) were similar over the 2 nights. The asthmatic patients maintained their minute ventilation as Rla increased during sleep, demonstrating a stable tidal volume with a mild increase in respiratory frequency. We conclude that in asthmatic patients with nocturnal worsening 1) Rla increases and FEV1 falls overnight regardless of sleep state, 2) sleep enhances the observed overnight increases in Rla, and 3) sleep does not abolish compensatory ventilatory responses to spontaneously occurring bronchoconstriction.

Citations

Dec 1, 1992·The British Journal of Surgery·J RosenbergH Kehlet
Sep 1, 1991·The American Review of Respiratory Disease·R D BallardD P White
Apr 1, 1990·The American Review of Respiratory Disease·N J Douglas, D C Flenley
Jun 2, 1998·American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine·R J Martin
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Related Concepts

Airway Resistance
Asthma
Lobar Bronchus Structure
Respiration
Sleep, Slow-Wave

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