Effect of the introducer technique compared with the pull technique on the peristomal infection rate in PEG: a meta-analysis

Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Paulo Moacir Oliveira CampoliMarília Dalva Turchi

Abstract

Peristomal infection is a main complication of PEG. The pull technique appears to be associated with higher infection rates compared with the introducer technique, although published results are controversial. To determine which technique is associated with a higher risk of infection. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies reporting rates of peristomal infection after PEG performed by either the pull or introducer technique. This study involved 2336 patients from 6 comparative and 10 observational studies. Public MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine journal articles database), Excerpta Medica Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information databases and proceedings of two meetings, Digestive Disease Week and United European Gastroenterology Week, were searched. Both comparative and observational studies were included and analyzed separately. Effect measures from each comparative study were reported as the odds ratio (OR). The pooled effect was then calculated. The infection rate in each observational study was also calculated, and a summary effect was then determined. In comparative studies, the risk of infection was significantly higher wit...Continue Reading

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Jun 21, 2016·Néphrologie & thérapeutique·Cindy CastraleThierry Lobbedez
May 17, 2017·United European Gastroenterology Journal·Felipe A RetesFauze Maluf-Filho
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