PMID: 41162Jan 1, 1979

Effect of trichloroacetic acid treatment on certain properties of spores of Bacillus cereus T

Microbiology and Immunology
H ShibataI Tani

Abstract

Spores of Bacillus cereus T treated with trichloroacetic acid (6.1--61.2 mM) were compared with untreated spores, and as the concentration of the chemical increased, the following alterations in spore properties were found: (1) the extent of germination decreased irrespective of the germination medium used; (2) the spores became sensitive to sodium hydroxide (1 N) and hydrochloric acid (0.27 N), but not to lysozyme (200 micrograms/ml); (3) loss of dipicolinate increased on subsequent heating; and (4) the spores became more sensitive to heat. However, trichloroacetic acid-treated spores were still viable and there was no significant change in spore components. The mechanism of action of trichloroacetic acid is discussed.

References

Feb 19, 2002·Journal of Applied Microbiology·B SetlowP Setlow
Jan 1, 1992·Microbiology and Immunology·H ShibataT HASHIMOTO

Citations

Oct 1, 1976·Journal of General Microbiology·C E Bayliss, W M Waites
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Related Concepts

Antibiotic Resistance, Microbial
Spores, Bacterial
Lysozyme Test
Dysentery, Bacillary
Reproduction Spores
Germination
Lysozyme
Muramidase
Plant spore
Intolerant of Heat

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