PMID: 38965Aug 1, 1979

Effects of 4 beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs on blood pressure and exercise heart rate in hypertension

European Journal of Cardiology
J D HarryC Newcombe

Abstract

The effects of 4 beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs on blood pressure and on exercise tachycardia were compared in a within-patient study of patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension. Twelve patients were treated with propranolol, practolol and atenolol and 7 of the same patients also received oxprenolol. Each patient received each drug separately, withdrawing each drug before starting the next, and each patient was titrated to the lowest attainable blood pressure and heart rate with each compound. All 4 drugs caused reductions in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and in the heart rate induced by exercise. The maximum reduction by each drug in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure was the same. There were small but significant differences in the effects on heart rate between those drugs which had intrinsic sympathomimetic activity and those which did not have this property.

Related Concepts

Depression, Chemical
Diastolic Blood Pressure
Essential Hypertension
Hypertensive Disease
Trasicor
Rexigen
Dalzic
Tenormin
Pulse Rate
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists

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