Nov 19, 2018

Emotional prosody in congenital amusia: impaired and spared processes

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Agathe PralusAnne Caclin

Abstract

Congenital amusia is a lifelong deficit of music processing, in particular of pitch processing. Most research investigating this neurodevelopmental disorder has focused on music perception, but pitch also has a critical role for intentional and emotional prosody in speech. Two previous studies investigating amusics emotional prosody recognition have shown either some deficit or no deficit (compared to controls). However, these previous studies have used only long sentence stimuli, which allow for limited control over acoustic content. Here, we tested amusic individuals for emotional prosody perception in sentences and vowels. For each type of material, participants performed an emotion categorization task, followed by intensity ratings of the recognized emotion. Compared to controls, amusic individuals had similar recognition of emotion in sentences, but poorer performance in vowels, especially when distinguishing sad and neutral stimuli. These lower performances in amusics were linked with difficulties in processing pitch and spectro-temporal parameters of the vowel stimuli. For emotion intensity, neither sentence nor vowel ratings differed between participant groups, suggesting preserved implicit processing of emotional proso...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Research
Classification
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Participant
Biologic Preservation
Recognition (Psychology)
Analysis
Speech
Emotions

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