Sep 18, 2010

Endocytosis and toxicity of clostridial binary toxins depend on a clathrin-independent pathway regulated by Rho-GDI

Cellular Microbiology
Maryse GibertMichel R Popoff

Abstract

Clostridial binary toxins, such as Clostridium perfringens Iota and Clostridium botulinum C2, are composed of a binding protein (Ib and C2II respectively) that recognizes distinct membrane receptors and mediates internalization of a catalytic protein (Ia and C2-I respectively) with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity that disrupts the actin cytoskeleton. We show here that the endocytic pathway followed by these toxins is independent of clathrin but requires the activity of dynamin and is regulated by Rho-GDI. This endocytic pathway is similar to a recently characterized clathrin-independent pathway followed by the interleukin-2 (IL2) receptor. We found indeed that Ib and C2II colocalized intracellularly with the IL2 receptor but not the transferrin receptor after different times of endocytosis. Accordingly, the intracellular effects of Iota and C2 on the cytoskeleton were inhibited by inactivation of dynamin or by Rho-GDI whereas inhibitors of clathrin-dependent endocytosis had no protective effect.

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Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Biochemical Pathway
Botulinum Toxins
Endocytosis
Toxin
Bacterial Toxins
CD71 antigen
Protoplasm
COS-7 Cells
Mono(ADP-Ribose) Transferases
Clathrin-mediated Endocytosis

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