Mar 26, 2015

Entire genome transcription across evolutionary time exposes non-coding DNA to de novo gene emergence

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Rafik Neme, Diethard Tautz

Abstract

Even in the best studied Mammalian genomes, less than 5% of the total genome length is annotated as exonic. However, deep sequencing analysis in humans has shown that around 40% of the genome may be covered by poly-adenylated non-coding transcripts occurring at low levels[1][1]. Their functional significance is unclear[2][2],[3][3], and there has been a dispute whether they should be considered as noise of the transcriptional machinery[4][4],[5][5]. We propose that if such transcripts show some evolutionary stability they will serve as substrates for de novo gene evolution, i.e. gene emergence out of non-coding DNA[6][6]–[8][7]. Here, we characterize the phylogenetic turnover of low-level poly-adenylated transcripts in a comprehensive sampling of populations, sub-species and species of the genus Mus , spanning a phylogenetic distance of about 10 Myr. We find evidence for more evolutionary stable gains of transcription than losses among closely related taxa, balanced by a loss of older transcripts across the whole phylogeny. We show that adding taxa increases the genomic transcript coverage and that no major transcript-free islands exist over time. This suggests that the entire genome can be transcribed into polyadenylated RNA w...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Exons
Genome
Genes
MYO1B
Transcription, Genetic
RNA, Polyadenylated
Transcription Process
Genomics
Deep Sequencing
Genus

Related Feeds

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.