Enzyme analyses of Bulinus africanus group snails (Mollusca: Planorbidae) from Tanzania

Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
D Rollinson, V R Southgate

Abstract

38 population samples of snails of the Bulinus africanus group, collected from three separate areas of Tanzania, have been examined. Enzymes in crude digestive gland extracts of individual snails have been analysed by isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gels. The enzymes studied were: malate dehydrogenase (MDH); phosphoglucomutase (PGM); glucosephosphate isomerase (GPI); acid phosphatase (AcP) and hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH). Samples of B. nasutus were clearly differentiated from other species and enzyme differences were apparent between samples from the lake and coastal areas. Similarly, although clear distinctions could not always be made, samples of B. africanus, B. globosus and B. ugandae were characterized by their enzyme types. Individual variation was detected within populations and the significance of enzyme polymorphisms in relation to identification has been considered. No correlation was found between snail enzyme type and susceptibility to Schistosoma haematobium or S. bovis.

References

May 1, 1961·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·C A WRIGHT

Citations

Jan 1, 1980·Zeitschrift Für Parasitenkunde·V R SouthgateR J Knowles
Dec 12, 2002·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·J R StothardD Rollinson
May 1, 1997·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·I R Stothard, D Rollinson
Jun 12, 2008·Parasites & Vectors·Richard A KaneD Rollinson
Jun 26, 2002·Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology·L Mubila, D Rollinson
Jan 28, 1999·Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz·D RollinsonL R Noble

Related Concepts

Acid Phosphatase
Metazoa
Bulinus
Autocrine Motility Factor
3-Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase
Alloenzymes
Malate Dehydrogenase
Phosphoglucomutase
Schistosoma

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