Dec 30, 2016

Epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD): associations with cardiovascular disease phenotypes and lipid factors

Eye and Vision
Katie L Pennington, Margaret M DeAngelis

Abstract

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in adults over 50 years old. Genetic, epidemiological, and molecular studies are beginning to unravel the intricate mechanisms underlying this complex disease, which implicate the lipid-cholesterol pathway in the pathophysiology of disease development and progression. Many of the genetic and environmental risk factors associated with AMD are also associated with other complex degenerative diseases of advanced age, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this review, we present epidemiological findings associating AMD with a variety of lipid pathway genes, cardiovascular phenotypes, and relevant environmental exposures. Despite a number of studies showing significant associations between AMD and these lipid/cardiovascular factors, results have been mixed and as such the relationships among these factors and AMD remain controversial. It is imperative that researchers not only tease out the various contributions of such factors to AMD development but also the connections between AMD and CVD to develop optimal precision medical care for aging adults.

Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Biochemical Pathway
Abnormal Degeneration
Genes
Environment
Research Personnel
Blind Vision
Cardiovascular Diseases
Glycogen Storage Disease Type II
Individualized Medicine

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