Epigenetic analysis of the Notch superfamily in high-grade serous ovarian cancer

Gynecologic Oncology
Cristina IvanAnil K Sood

Abstract

Gene methylation and other epigenetic modifications of gene regulation have been implicated in the growth of ovarian cancer, but the clinical significance of such modifications in the Notch pathway in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGS-OvCa) is not well understood. We used The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data to study the clinical relevance of epigenetic modifications of Notch superfamily genes. We analyzed the interaction of DNA methylation and miRNAs with gene expression data for Notch superfamily members with the Spearman rank correlation test and explored potential relationships with overall survival (OS) with the log-rank test. We downloaded clinical data, level 3 gene expression data, and level 3 DNA methylation data for 480 patients with stage II-IV HGS-OvCa from the TCGA data portal. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation cohorts for survival analyses. In each set, patients were grouped into percentiles according to methylation and microRNA (miRNA) or messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. We used several algorithms to predict miRNA-mRNA interaction. There were significant inverse relationships between methylation status and mRNA expression for PPARG, CCND1, and RUNX1. For each of these genes, patients with...Continue Reading

References

Apr 10, 2014·Gynecologic Oncology·Ben DavidsonReuven Reich
Jan 27, 2016·APMIS : Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica, Et Immunologica Scandinavica·Kira Philipsen PrahmEstrid Høgdall
Aug 4, 2015·The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology·R ChiaramonteN Platonova
Feb 13, 2013·Gynecologic Oncology·Douglas A Levine, Elizabeth M Swisher
Nov 5, 2014·Journal of Ovarian Research·Jolijn W GroenewegBo R Rueda
Jul 29, 2015·Human Pathology·Betina KatzBen Davidson
Dec 11, 2013·Gynecologic Oncology·Monjri M Shah, Charles N Landen
Mar 27, 2013·International Journal of Molecular Sciences·Mi Jeong Kwon, Young Kee Shin
Nov 23, 2017·Oncotarget·Qipeng FanYan Xu

Citations

Jan 7, 2004·Nature Reviews. Cancer·Liliane MichalikWalter Wahli
Sep 19, 2007·Cancer Research·Marilena V IorioCarlo M Croce
Jan 16, 2008·Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology·Charles N LandenAnil K Sood
Nov 17, 2009·Breast Cancer Research and Treatment·Brenda CohenMichael Reedijk
Mar 30, 2010·Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine·Shuang-Di LiXiao-Ping Wan
Apr 28, 2010·Gynecologic Oncology·Reza AsadollahiXiao Yan Zhong
Jul 16, 2011·Hormones & Cancer·Antonio F SaadAnil K Sood

Related Concepts

Biochemical Pathway
PPARgamma2
Receptors, Notch
RUNX1 gene
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
DNA Methylation [PE]
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Untranslated Regions
Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous
Protein Methylation

Related Feeds

Cell Signaling & Cancer Epigenetics (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. This feed covers the latest research on signaling and epigenetics in cell growth and cancer.

Cancer Epigenetics & Metabolism (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. This feed focuses on the relationship between cell metabolism, epigenetics and tumor differentiation.

Cancer Epigenetics

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics.

Cancer Epigenetics (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics.

Breast Cancer: BRCA1 & BRCA2

Mutations involving BRCA1, found on chromosome 17, and BRCA2, found on chromosome 13, increase the risk for specific cancers, such as breast cancer. Discover the last research on breast cancer BRCA1 and BRCA2 here.

Cancer Epigenetics and Senescence (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may be involved in regulating senescence in cancer cells. This feed captures the latest research on cancer epigenetics and senescence.

Cancer Epigenetics & Methyl-CpG (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. Here is the latest research on cancer epigenetics and methyl-CpG binding proteins including ZBTB38.

Related Papers

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Joellen M SchildkrautJeffrey R Marks
The Journal of Clinical Investigation
Roel G W VerhaakCancer Genome Atlas Research Network
© 2020 Meta ULC. All rights reserved