Jan 1, 1991

Etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in Gambian children: II. Acute lower respiratory tract infection in children ages one to nine years presenting at the hospital

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
I M ForgieBrian M Greenwood

Abstract

Seventy-four children ages 1 to 9 years hospitalized because of severe pneumonia were investigated using blood cultures, lung aspirates, nasopharyngeal aspirates, serology and antigen detection procedures. A bacterial infection was identified in 57 (77%), a viral infection was seen in 25 (34%) and 18 (24%) had mixed viral-bacterial infections. The bacterial pathogens most frequently identified were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae found in 61 and 15% of patients, respectively. The viral pathogen most frequently recovered was respiratory syncytial virus (12%). Evidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae strain TWAR and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was found in 12 and 4% of cases, respectively. Overall a potential pathogen was identified in 60 (81%) children, with evidence of polymicrobial infection in 30 cases (40.5%). The study provides information on the relative role of different infectious agents in the etiology of severe pneumonia in children in a developing country.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Chlamydia Infections
Mycoplasma pneumoniae
Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Haemophilus influenzae
Meningitis, Haemophilus
Virus Diseases
Lung
Nasopharynx
Pathogenic Organism
Paramyxoviridae Infections

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