PMID: 1848Jan 1, 1975

Evaluation of the antibiotic effect of treatment of maxillary sinusitis

Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
C CarenfeltB Wretlind

Abstract

As the effect of antibiotic treatment of maxillary sinusitis has been questioned, the elimination of bacteria from sinus secretions was studied during antibiotic treatment. Penicillin V, azidocillin, tetracycline or doxycycline was administered to 54 patients with maxillary sinusitis. Samples of sinus secretion were aspirated both before treatment and 2-3 days after the onset of treatment. When the antibiotic concentration was below the upper limit of MIC for sensitivity group 1, bacterial growth was present in practically all samples. When the antibiotic concentration equalled or was above this limit, there was no bacterial growth in about half of the samples. A prerequisite for antibiotic effect--elimination of bacteria--is that the antibiotic concentration is well above the MIC of the bacteria at the site of infection. The choice between bactericidal or bacteriostatic antibiotics appeared unimportant. Bacterial survival in the maxillary sinus despite a high antibiotic concentration in the sinus illustrates that MIC values determined in the laboratory do not always mirror the sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics in vivo.

References

Jan 1, 1973·Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases·C Lundberg, A S Malmborg
Jan 1, 1974·Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases·C Lundberg, A S Malmborg
Mar 1, 1968·The American Journal of the Medical Sciences·N H SteigbigelM Finland
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Citations

Nov 1, 1996·European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases : Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology·R HayleT Odegård
Nov 17, 2004·Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America·Merle A Sande, Jack M Gwaltney
Nov 1, 1983·American Journal of Otolaryngology·Jack M Gwaltney
Apr 6, 2004·Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America·I Brook
Dec 31, 2003·Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America·Jack M GwaltneyJames T Patrie
Dec 1, 1981·Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences·S E Reed
Apr 1, 1983·Journal of Clinical Pathology·R C Bridger
Jan 1, 1978·CRC Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences·D H Rice
Jul 1, 1976·Acta Oto-laryngologica·C CarenfeltK Karlén
Oct 17, 2015·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Anneli Ahovuo-SalorantaMarjukka Mäkelä
Jun 1, 1989·The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology·I Brook
Jan 1, 1982·Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology·C Herberhold
Sep 19, 1998·American Journal of Rhinology·J HsuD W Kennedy

Related Concepts

Antibiotics
Doxycycline Phosphate (1: 1)
Haemophilus influenzae
Maxillary Sinus
Van-Pen-G
Vegacillin
Sinusitis
Streptococcus
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Topicycline

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