Evidence for a transcriptional signature of breast cancer

Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Yumei FengXishan Hao

Abstract

Cancer arises from a step-wise accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, followed by changes in transcription and protein profiles. To identify the intrinsic transcriptional features of breast cancer and to explore in more detail the molecular basis of breast carcinogenesis, genes differentially expressed between cancers and their paired normal breast samples in nine breast cancer patients were screened using microarray. Nine normal breast tissues and 49 breast cancer tissue samples were then clustered based on the set of differentially expressed genes. A transcriptional signature of breast cancer consisting of 188 differentially expressed genes was identified. This signature allowed the normal breast tissues to be distinguished from all of the breast cancer samples, and primary breast cancers could be classified into two phenotype-associated subgroups with different ER status and clinical outcome. Furthermore, the classification accuracy of the set of differentially expressed genes was validated in publically available breast microarray data. Moreover, the differentially expressed genes could be grouped into five subclusters involved in different biological processes of carcinogene...Continue Reading

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Related Concepts

Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Cross-talk
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Transcription, Genetic
Subtraction Technique
Neoplasms
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Study of Epigenetics
Lymphatic Metastasis

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