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Evidence that strong positive selection drives neofunctionalization in the tandemly duplicated polyhomeotic genes in Drosophila

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Apr 3, 2008

Steffen Beisswanger, Wolfgang Stephan

Abstract

The polyhomeotic (ph) locus in Drosophila melanogaster consists of the two tandemly duplicated genes ph-d (distal) and ph-p (proximal). They code for transcriptional repressors belonging to the Polycomb group proteins, which regulate homeotic genes and hundreds of other loci. Although t...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Genes, Insect
Nucleoproteins
Drosophila melanogaster Proteins
Polaron
Transcription, Genetic
Pc
OCA2 gene
Drosophila
X Chromosome
DNA Resequencing
Paper Details
References
  • References34
  • Citations36
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  • References34
  • Citations36
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Evidence that strong positive selection drives neofunctionalization in the tandemly duplicated polyhomeotic genes in Drosophila

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Apr 3, 2008

Steffen Beisswanger, Wolfgang Stephan

PMID: 18381818

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0710892105

Abstract

The polyhomeotic (ph) locus in Drosophila melanogaster consists of the two tandemly duplicated genes ph-d (distal) and ph-p (proximal). They code for transcriptional repressors belonging to the Polycomb group proteins, which regulate homeotic genes and hundreds of other loci. Although t...read more

Mentioned in this Paper

Genes, Insect
Nucleoproteins
Drosophila melanogaster Proteins
Polaron
Transcription, Genetic
Pc
OCA2 gene
Drosophila
X Chromosome
DNA Resequencing

Feeds With Similar Papers

Hox Gene Family

The homeobox genes (Hox gene family) encode for homeodomain-containing transcription factors, which are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation. They have a conserved DNA binding domain that are found in the family of hox genes. Discover the latest research on hox gene family here.

Polycomb Group Proteins

This feed focuses on the Polycomb Group Proteins, which are protein complexes that are recruited to chromatin and are involved in the deposition of repressive histone marks, leading to gene repression.

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