PMID: 7916055Jun 1, 1994Paper

Evolutionary relationships of bacterial and archaeal glutamine synthetase genes

Journal of Molecular Evolution
J R BrownW F Doolittle

Abstract

Glutamine synthetase (GS), an essential enzyme in ammonia assimilation and glutamine biosynthesis, has three distinctive types: GSI, GSII and GSIII. Genes for GSI have been found only in bacteria (eubacteria) and archaea (archaebacteria), while GSII genes only occur in eukaryotes and a few soil-dwelling bacteria. GSIII genes have been found in only a few bacterial species. Recently, it has been suggested that several lateral gene transfers of archaeal GSI genes to bacteria may have occurred. In order to study the evolution of GS, we cloned and sequenced GSI genes from two divergent archaeal species: the extreme thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus and the extreme halophile Haloferax volcanii. Our phylogenetic analysis, which included most available GS sequences, revealed two significant prokaryotic GSI subdivisions: GSI-alpha and GSI-beta. GSI-alpha-genes are found in the thermophilic bacterium, Thermotoga maritima, the low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, and the Euryarchaeota (includes methanogens, halophiles, and some thermophiles). GSI-beta-type genes occur in all other bacteria. GSI-alpha- and GSI-beta-type genes also differ with respect to a specific 25-amino-acid insertion and adenylylation control of GS enzyme activity, both abse...Continue Reading

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