PMID: 107818Jan 1, 1979

Experimental transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti to monkeys

The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
J H CrossS Oemijati

Abstract

Infective larvae of Wuchereria bancrofti from laboratory-raised Culex pipiens fatigans and Aedes togoi mosquitoes fed on human volunteers in Jakarta, Indonesia (J strain) and Kinmen Island, China (K strain) were introduced into Taiwan monkeys (Macaca cyclopis) by subcutaneous inoculation, by foot puncture, or by permitting infected mosquitoes to feed weekly on the monkeys. Some animals were splenectomized and others were treated with varying regimens of immunosuppressants. Necropsy was done on monkeys that died or were killed and the entire bodies were examined for worms. A total of 78 monkeys (43 males and 35 females) were exposed to infection and parasites were found in 29% of the females and 63% of males. In infections of 38 days or less worms were recovered from the testes of males and the pelt, carcass and lymph nodes of both sexes, but after 42 days of infection most worms were in the testes of males, and a few were recovered from lymph nodes and carcasses of females. Worms recovered at 8-11 days were third-stage, those found between 14 and 38 days fourth-stage, and ones found between 42 and 103 days were young adults. After 148 days most were adults and microfilariae were seen in the uteri of female worms at 160 days and...Continue Reading

Citations

Sep 1, 1989·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·K F Snowden, B Hammerberg
Sep 1, 1987·The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·E D FrankeI Wiady
Jun 1, 1989·Journal of Helminthology·D A DenhamC M Hetherington
Mar 1, 1988·Parasite Immunology·V C Ogbogu, D M Storey
Dec 1, 2009·Journal of Parasitic Diseases : Official Organ of the Indian Society for Parasitology·K P PailyP K Das

Related Concepts

Aedes
Anthropoidea
Night Monkey, Northern
Culex (Genus)
Filariasis
Therapeutic Immunosuppression
Lymph Nodes
Macaca
Macaca fascicularis
Macaca mulatta

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