Jan 1, 2013

Expression of miR-17-92 enhances anti-tumor activity of T-cells transduced with the anti-EGFRvIII chimeric antigen receptor in mice bearing human GBM xenografts

Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer
M OhnoHideho Okada

Abstract

Expression of miR-17-92 enhances T-cell survival and interferon (IFN)-γ production. We previously reported that miR-17-92 is down-regulated in T-cells derived from glioblastoma (GBM) patients. We hypothesized that transgene-derived co-expression of miR17-92 and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) in T-cells would improve the efficacy of adoptive transfer therapy against GBM. We constructed novel lentiviral vectors for miR-17-92 (FG12-EF1a-miR-17/92) and a CAR consisting of an epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII)-specific, single-chain variable fragment (scFv) coupled to the T-cell receptor CD3ζ chain signaling module and co-stimulatory motifs of CD137 (4-1BB) and CD28 in tandem (pELNS-3C10-CAR). Human T-cells were transduced with these lentiviral vectors, and their anti-tumor effects were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. CAR-transduced T-cells (CAR-T-cells) exhibited potent, antigen-specific, cytotoxic activity against U87 GBM cells that stably express EGFRvIII (U87-EGFRvIII) and, when co-transduced with miR-17-92, exhibited improved survival in the presence of temozolomide (TMZ) compared with CAR-T-cells without miR-17-92 co-transduction. In mice bearing intracranial U87-EGFRvIII xenografts, CAR-T-cells with...Continue Reading

Mentioned in this Paper

EEF1A1 gene
In Vivo
T-Lymphocyte
Strategy
TNFRSF9 gene
Carney Complex
MIR17HG gene
Receptors, Antigen
MIR17 gene
Patient Transfer

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