Oct 31, 2018

Extracellular electron uptake by two Methanosarcina species

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Mon Oo YeeAmelia-Elena Rotaru

Abstract

Direct electron uptake by prokaryotes is a recently described mechanism with a potential application for energy and CO2 storage into value added chemicals. Members of Methanosarcinales, an environmentally and biotechnologically relevant group of methanogens, were previously shown to retrieve electrons from an extracellular electrogenic partner performing Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer (DIET) and were therefore proposed to be electroactive. However, their intrinsic electroactivity has never been examined. In this study, we tested two methanogens belonging to the genus Methanosarcina, M. barkeri and M. horonobensis, regarding their ability to accept electrons directly from insoluble electron donors like other cells, conductive particles and electrodes. Both methanogens were able to retrieve electrons from Geobacter metallireducens via DIET. Furthermore, DIET was also stimulated upon addition of electrically conductive granular activated carbon (GAC) when each was co-cultured with G. metallireducens. However, when provided with a cathode poised at -400 mV (vs. SHE), only M. barkeri could perform electromethanogenesis. In contrast, the strict hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanobacterium formicicum, did not produce methane r...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Prokaryotic potassium channel
Methanobacterium
Extracellular
Methane
Coculture Techniques
Energy Metabolism
Methanobacterium formicicum
Uptake
Electron Transport

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