Factors enhancing the control of Buruli ulcer in the Bomfa communities, Ghana

Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Pius AgbenorkuPaul Saunderson

Abstract

This study examines factors that may enhance the control and holistic treatment of Buruli ulcer in an endemic area of the Ashanti Region in Ghana. A total of 189 Buruli ulcer patients from the Bomfa sub-district were treated at the Global Evangelical Mission Hospital, Apromase-Ashanti, Ghana, from January to December 2005. Diagnosis was based on clinical findings and confirmed by any two positives of Ziehl-Neelson test for acid fast bacilli, polymerase chain reaction and histopathology. Children up to age 14 made up 43.4% of the cases; male: female ratio was 3:2. The mean duration of hospitalization was 77 days and hospital stay was significantly correlated with the time spent at home with the disease prior to admission; also, 76.7% of the cases were late ulcers. Of the 189 patients, 145 (i.e. 76.7%) were treated with antibiotics and surgery which involved excision, skin grafting with or without contracture release. A follow-up survey after the introduction of the psychosocial approach recorded fewer (85) new Buruli ulcer (BU) cases of which, the majority (78.8%, 67) were nodules and only 21.2% (18) were ulcers. Health education plays a major role in the holistic treatment of BU. This paper proposes a further study in other end...Continue Reading

References

Dec 20, 2012·Journal of Tropical Medicine·Pius AgbenorkuPaul Saunderson
Jan 1, 2012·Infectious Diseases of Poverty·Mercy M AckumeyMitchell G Weiss
Oct 26, 2016·Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene·Anthony O MekaKingsley N Ukwaja
Mar 10, 2018·PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases·Gilbert Adjimon AyeloGhislain Emmanuel Sopoh
Aug 24, 2018·The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews·Rie R YotsuNorihisa Ishii

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Related Concepts

Contracture
Nodule
Amputated Structure (Morphologic Abnormality)
Antibiotic throat preparations
Antifungal Antibiotics, Topical
Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis
Contraction (Finding)
Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm
Dental Plaque
Etiology

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